Saturday, April 30, 2011

Collecting relationships, and meeting Collectibles author James J. Kaufman

I'm delighted to welcome author James J. Kaufman to my blog today. I reviewed his book, The Collectibles, earlier this week--a fascinating read that switches from Adirondack mountain beauty to big-city law and mingles characters as real and different as the worlds they inhabit. 

And... I'm delighted to add that The Collectibles is Nautilus Silver Book Award winner !!! Congratulations !!!

An attorney, businessman and former judge, James J. Kaufman has published several works of non-fiction. Kaufman lives in Wilmington, North Carolina with his wife, Patty. The Collectibles is his debut novel and he is currently working on writing his second novel.

I suspect that second novel will be well worth looking out for. Over to you Mr. Kaufman, and thank you for visiting my blog.


Readers often ask how I came up with the idea of “Collectibles” as people. For years I have watched people collect and proudly display all kinds of things (watches, clocks, figurines, furniture, cars, dolls, stamps, coins, whatever) and I am a collector myself (old bullet molds, wooden boxes). My idea, conceptually, for the use of “Collectibles” in terms of people, is not driven by collecting or possession. On the contrary, The Collectibles is a concept of relationships, an opportunity for one person to reach out to another person who is in difficulty, challenged in some way, and help that person. In the process, the helper comes to realize the intrinsic worth and value of the individual in need and receiving the help. Inherent in the concept proposed in The Collectibles is that the same level of intensity often employed towards the physical objects of our collection effort, should be devoted to building better relationships with and helping other people in need. There is tremendous value in making this outreach, both for the receiver and the giver. The receiver’s self worth and self esteem is enhanced and as their difficulties are unbundled and improved, they become happier and more appreciative of their lives and the people that have helped them. The friend who is lending the helping hand, in a sense the caregiver, is also a beneficiary in the process. More often than not the person extending the effort to help ultimately receives more in return. The Collectibles is not about collecting people, it’s about building relationships that help those who participate with the intent to help one another. It’s not about control or money, it’s about extension of the heart.

4 comments:

Maria Papadopoulou said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Ruthi aka abitosunshine said...

Hats off to you, James! This sounds like a book to add to my TBR list for sure. I've been on both sides of the "collectibles" and I've won both ways.

Thank you for a great author intro, Sheila!

Stephen Tremp said...

Its nice to meet you, James. Best wishes for your success with The Collectibles!

Carol Kilgore said...

Sheila, just stopping by to wish you a great trip.